Finding a Better Way to Draw the Lines

James Madison said in Federalist No. 52, “where annual elections end, tyranny begins;” which prompts the question: ‘how close to tyranny do we come, when those annual elections are shaped to all but ensure a nominee’s victory?’ This is precisely the question the Supreme Court will have to ask in what…

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The GOP Goes Nuclear

On April 3rd, the same day Supreme Court Justice appointee Neil Gorsuch was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee (strictly upon partisan lines), four Senators announced that they would be opposing Judge Gorsuch, “bringing the Democrat caucus to the 41 votes needed to sustain a filibuster.” It would be the first…

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Meet and Greet

While I love teaching students about politics, there is nothing more exhilarating than actually working on a political campaign. I have worked four local races and have discovered this is where the action is. People really care about who will represent them at city hall and in the state capital.…

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Consequences of Accepting a False Dilemma

As I am composing this post, I am listening to a great debate by two top-tier American politicians who are passionate and well-versed in their beliefs and while they may be taking jabs at each other’s party and stances, but are not belittling each other. Audience members are asking tough…

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Undemocratic by Design

With the Electoral College vote on the horizon, it might be helpful to look at a history of the institution. In 1824, America hosted an election for the 6th President of the United States. Of the four candidates running (Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, William H. Crawford & Henry Clay),…

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Semper (In)Fidelis

In the two weeks since the election, we have seen protest in the streets and the theaters, and the creation of safe spaces at schools and colleges. We have also heard a lot of talk about the Electoral College. Some want to eliminate the Electoral College altogether, relying instead on…

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Will Chris Wallace Step Up to the Plate?

There are three stations necessary for a professional political debate: the orators, the moderator and the audience. The role of the orators is to argue their respective positions and attempt to persuade the audience. The audience is meant to listen attentively to the orators’ positions and come to a reasonable…

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